Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Marriage to the Divine

Some days ago I wrote a comment on Cat's blog
Quaker Batman I've decided to repost it here. There are times when I write from my head and other times when I write from my heart. On this occasion, I wrote from my heart and my brain was surprised. Being a person who likes to organize things and keep them tidy, I thought I'd keep this here to remind myself that my heart often knows what my brain does not. Here's what I wrote:

Cat, as I was reading this, I was thinking that I've not imagined that turning toward the mundane was actually turning away from the divine. I guess the way I think of this is more like marriage. The Divine is the Beloved but as in a successful marriage, one cannot maintain the first blush of infatuation, the deepest moments of passion, the intensity of emotional or physical intimacy...at least not all the time. There are times when the divine energy is rapturous, burning, consuming and deep. And there are times when the relationship is practical, common and everyday. After searing spiritual revelation, God stays with me in the often dull work of manifestation, of bringing the fruits of divine conception to maturity. The Egyptians called their husbands "brother." And like a husband/brother, I am allowed to take "him" for granted, to joke with "him", to speak to "him" in the way couples have of shorthand jokes, body language and just a "look." This is an intimacy far beyond passion. This is the intimacy of the everyday. Whenever I look up from laundry, dishes, or even Star Trek, there "he" is- gentle and ever-present.

4 comments:

Bright Crow said...

Dear One,

One of my favorite Zen aphorisms:

"After enlightenment, the laundry."

:-)

Michael Bright Crow

Daniel Wilcox said...

Hi Hystery,

I'm glad you are having more of a sense of God's Reality. Sometime I would be interested in hearing of a time when you experienced God deeply such as when you said,"There are times when the divine energy is rapturous, burning, consuming and deep. And there are times when the relationship is practical, common, and every day. After searing revelation...This is an intimacy of the everyday.."

Here is where my problem is, in the daily. I seldom experience God in mudane. In the past I had "searing" openings, but mostly in the last few years, my trust in the Divine is an intellectual head convincement. My emotional heart is often feels like disciples after the crucifixion: Where is God in this hour right now, in this tragic life here?

As for
"even Star Trek.."
Are you looking forward to the new Star Trek movie coming out in May? And I have a brief story for you about two Trek-lovers. My son and his girlfriend often dated watching year after year of the Treks. At one point she had to move away for a job. One night I came downstairs and saw my son watching ST by himself but talking on his cellphone. It turned out they had both rented the same episode and were watching it together hundreds of miles apart and talking to each other about the show via their cell phones! Now isn't that the ultimate nerd date:-)

In the Light,
Daniel

Hystery said...

Michael, I love that one too. Some years ago I began to practice mindful laundry. Laundry as spiritual service and meditation. Might as well. If you can't beat it, intellectualize it. ;-)

Daniel, I've always experienced the Divine pretty much without interruption. You can imagine that when my intellectual community demands otherwise, this is really frustrating. I call my mundane experiences of the Divine "tomato soup moments". (I tend to get emotional about the wonder of the shine on the surface of tomato soup. Have you looked at that? It is incredibly beautiful.) And doing the laundry or picking worms up off the ground after the rain become mystical moments. And then every once in awhile there's a tremendous spike of energy that has had the power to literally knock me to my knees.

My intellect is in my way. No, check that. My intellect and my experience are temporarily out of balance. I guess I'll have to ruminate about this later.

Meanwhile, the post-resurrection reference is probably the most apt description of where I am now. I don't know if you were thinking of my post The Saturday After Resurrection but that's how I feel. (Note that both the Christian and Pagan references are metaphorical rather than literal references)

Daniel Wilcox said...
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